Waiting on Reparations

The Art of War

This week, Dope KNife chops it up with leftist activist and battle rapper extrordinaire Soul Khan and discusses the roots and ethics of battle rap culture with cohost Linqua Franqa, reflecting on famous rap battles of history– Kool Moe Dee vs. Busy Bee, Boogie Down Productions vs. Juice Crew, as examples — in the closeout.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Bars and Sentences

This week, Linqua Franqa and Dope KNife break down the role of the district attorney and discuss the “progressive prosecutor” movement with focus on one of its figureheads, Larry Krasner, who two weeks ago faced off with police-union backed, law-and-order challenger Carlos Vega in the Democratic primary for District Attorney of Philadelphia. They discuss what these election results mean for the progressive prosecutor movement in the wake of the George Floyd uprising as well as how DAs shape the lives of rappers from Meek Mill to Biggie and more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Empire State of the South

This week, Linqua Franqa is joined by journalist Matt Pulver to discuss the impacts of neoliberalism on the city of Atlanta, touching on housing, water privatization, the rise of the police state and how the neoliberalization of these facets of life in Atlanta shows up in the music of T.I., Gucci Mane, Denzel Curry, Goodie Mob and others. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

From Ferguson to Palestine

This week, Dope KNife and Linqua Franqa take a look back at the historical and material ties between Black liberation movements and the Palestinian liberation struggle, tipping their hats to Palestinian emcees DAM and Belly along the way. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Shakurs

This week, Dope KNife and Linqua Franqa shake the Shakur family tree, probing the revolutionary lives of Tupac’s godmother, Assata Shakur, his mother, Afeni Shakur, and his stepfather, Mutulu Shakur. In the music discussion, they examine how these black revolutionary influences are found in Pac’s catalogue as well as rap writ large, from Pac’s own “White Manz World” and his collection of poetry, “The Rose That Grew from Concrete” to Common’s biographical track, “Song for Assata.”  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Haitian Spring

This week, Dope KNife and Linqua Franqa explore Haitian unrest past and present, from the Haitian Revolution of the 1790’s today’s uprising against president Jovenel Moise. Linqua Franqa speaks with journalist and activist Eugene Puryear about his recent travels to Haiti and coverage of the most recent popular uprising against authoritarianism and government corruption that has taken the country by storm in recent months. And in closing, the rappers introduce rappers to the Rap Kreyol stylings of Izolan and Yani Martelly. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Spitting Images: Immortal Technique

And we’re back! This week, Dope KNife and Linqua Franqa resurface to address the Derek Chauvin verdict before turning to their main feature: a conversation with activist and underground Hip Hop legend Immortal Technique about his community organizing, the roots of his revolutionary views, his anti-imperialist political praxis and his long awaited, forthcoming album “The Middle Passage.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Why’s It Always Gotta Be Georgia

This week, Linqua Franqa speaks with Atlanta city council candidate, community organizer, and Black Futurist Group co-founder Devin Barrington Ward about the odious recent work of the Georgia state legislature, from the infamous voter suppression bill that saw Representative Park Cannon arrested last Thursday and to efforts to roll back progress around reimagined public safety, as well as what these pieces of legislation tell us about the state of white supremacy and the future of organizing in the South. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Back That Vax Up

This week, hosts Dope KNife and Linqua Franqa explore the history of vaccine hesitancy and today’s sources of skepticism around getting the Covid jab, beginning way back in the largely forgotten era of smallpox and bringing us into the contemporary discussion around vaccine education, access, and weariness, weaving together the voices of artists from MIA to Royce Da 5’9 and Nas as they explore the range of perspectives around inoculation. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

“U Want Another President?”

Hosts Dope KNife and Linqua Franqa continue their recent globetrotting with a trip to Uganda, where last week opposition presidential candidate and rapper Bobi Wine was arrested for protesting the detention of supporters who called into question the results of January’s Ugandan presidential election. They discuss the slow rise of multiparty politics in Uganda, Wine’s personal rise to political power, the appeal of liberal democratic politics among the fed-up Ugandan youth, and the ncumbent president Yoweri Museveni’s attempts to co-opt Hip Hop as a cover for his regime’s repressive malfeasance. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Hip-Propaganda

This week, hosts Dope KNife and Linqua Franqa explore Hip Hop’s weaponization as propaganda in response to the recent musical clash between a team of anti-communist, Cuban-exiled emcees and their homeland government’s defensive line of patriotic salseros. They then globetrot to examine other examples of rap used to further political agendas, from the jihadist rap of Deso Dogg and Salah Edin, raising eyebrows in Germany and the Netherlands, respectively, to CD Rev’s state-sanctioned ode to their native Chinese soil. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Home Is Where The Bars Is

This week, hosts Dope KNife and Linqua Franqa unbundle the issues of homelessness and housing precarity, examining their intersection with mental health, substance abuse, poverty wages, and the cascading effects of capitalist pressures on the housing market. DK speaks with Xulu Jones, speaker and frontman for the Savannah-based psychedelic rock group Xulu Prophet, about his personal experiences of the unseen realities of living on the street. And the hosts explore Hip Hop depictions of society’s down-and-out, from Arrested Development to Kendrick Lamar. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

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